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quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
quick glimpse into my recent life 
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cavetocanvas:

Ana Mendieta, Silueta Works in Mexico, 1973-77
From The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles:

Ana Mendieta was born into a politically prominent family in Cuba closely affiliated with the Communist movement led by Fidel Castro. When the alliance between Castro’s factions and Mendieta’s father turned sour in 1961, she was sent to live in the United States. Her exile informed the development of her ensuing work; she did not identify with a particular homeland and adopted various sites for her performances and their documentation. The untitled works that comprise the Silueta series, which she preformed as she traveled between Iowa and Mexico, reveal her interest in the earth as a site to address issues of displacement by recording the presence of her body—or the imprint it left behind—within different natural environments. Mendieta often filled in the silhouette of her body on the earth with various materials such as rocks, twigs, and flowers, as well as blood and gunpowder.
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Swedish wedding crown from the 18th century
Spraynard Is Back Although They Never Really Left | NOISEY
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bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
bumblebae:

Katherine Wolkoff- Deer Beds
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medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Kehinde Wiley

Los Angeles native and New York-based visual artist Kehinde Wiley has firmly situated himself within art history’s portrait painting tradition. As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists—including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others—Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world. By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley’s larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men.
-skny.com

1. Down With a Bullet, 2011., 2. Femme Piquee par un Serpent, 2008, oil on canvas. 3. Matador, 2009. Oil on paper 57.5” x 134.5”., 4. Sleep, 2008. Oil on canvas 132” x 300”.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Kehinde Wiley

Los Angeles native and New York-based visual artist Kehinde Wiley has firmly situated himself within art history’s portrait painting tradition. As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists—including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others—Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world. By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley’s larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men.
-skny.com

1. Down With a Bullet, 2011., 2. Femme Piquee par un Serpent, 2008, oil on canvas. 3. Matador, 2009. Oil on paper 57.5” x 134.5”., 4. Sleep, 2008. Oil on canvas 132” x 300”.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Kehinde Wiley

Los Angeles native and New York-based visual artist Kehinde Wiley has firmly situated himself within art history’s portrait painting tradition. As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists—including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others—Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world. By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley’s larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men.
-skny.com

1. Down With a Bullet, 2011., 2. Femme Piquee par un Serpent, 2008, oil on canvas. 3. Matador, 2009. Oil on paper 57.5” x 134.5”., 4. Sleep, 2008. Oil on canvas 132” x 300”.
medievalpoc:

Contemporary Art Week!
Kehinde Wiley

Los Angeles native and New York-based visual artist Kehinde Wiley has firmly situated himself within art history’s portrait painting tradition. As a contemporary descendent of a long line of portraitists—including Reynolds, Gainsborough, Titian, Ingres, and others—Wiley engages the signs and visual rhetoric of the heroic, powerful, majestic, and sublime in his representation of urban black and brown men found throughout the world. By applying the visual vocabulary and conventions of glorification, wealth, prestige, and history to subject matter drawn from the urban fabric, Wiley makes his subjects and their stylistic references juxtaposed inversions of each other, forcing ambiguity and provocative perplexity to pervade his imagery. Wiley’s larger-than-life figures disturb and interrupt tropes of portrait painting, often blurring the boundaries between traditional and contemporary modes of representation and the critical portrayal of masculinity and physicality as it pertains to the view of black and brown young men.
-skny.com

1. Down With a Bullet, 2011., 2. Femme Piquee par un Serpent, 2008, oil on canvas. 3. Matador, 2009. Oil on paper 57.5” x 134.5”., 4. Sleep, 2008. Oil on canvas 132” x 300”.
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heres my butt and two other cute butts in culebra, PR